Mobile phone radiation and less well known fertility factors

Over the past few weeks we have been looking at what causes male infertility and some of the science behind it. Most people know that smoking and drinking alcohol to excess can cause infertility but what about some of the less well known fertility factors?

Stress has a big effect on many aspects of our health – including our fertility. Stress can inhibit the production of sperm and testosterone as well as making you tired and increasing the chances of other illnesses. This can affect your fertility within your body but also the chances of you putting it to the test, feeling less amorous.

Sleep disorders are more common than you might think and sleep deprivation is thought to affect millions of people. The Mental Health Foundation in a 2011 report found that only 38% of people were “good sleepers”. Almost as many had insomnia. When our sleep is bad it disrupts our natural circadian rhythm and this can lead to obesity – a factor in fertility itself – depression, diabetes and heart disease. Plus, low energy levels and fatigue is going to affect your performance in the bedroom.

Sperm are being produced all the time and are sensitive to changes within the body: hormones, sleep patterns, stress and illness, as well as general health and fitness. Studies have also shown that sperm are vulnerable to mobile phone radiation. The electromagnetic field that brings wireless connectivity to phones can damage sperm and experts describe it as “cooking”. This isn’t helped by men wearing their phone on their belt or carrying it in a front pocket – right next to the sensitive area.

What about that joke about men in tight cycling shorts having a low sperm count? Turns out it may not be such a joke after all as many experts do believe that sperm will suffer if they are too hot.

Have you heard of any less well known fertility factors?

Share your thoughts in the comments below!


Frances F
Frances F

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